Sam Elliot Talks About His Latest Film THE MAN WHO KILLED HITLER AND THEN THE BIGFOOT

sam-elliot-talks-about-his-latest-film-the-man-who-killed-hitler-and-then-the-bigfoot-social.jpg

We really don't know much about Sam Elliot's new film The Man Who Killed Hitler and Then The Bigfoot. All we've been given so far is a poster, a synopsis, and a very intriguing title. Based on those things, I'm extremely excited to see this movie! 

For those of you, like myself, looking for some more information on the film, Sam Elliot and director Robert D. Krzykowski sat down with /Film to talk about the movie and it sounds like they really enjoyed creating it. Before we get into it, here's the synopsis:

Sam Elliott (Tombstone, Road House) stars as a legendary World War II veteran who many years ago assassinated Adolf Hitler – an incredible secret that he’s frustratingly unable to share with the world. One day, just as he’s coming to terms with rounding out his life, Calvin gets a visit from the FBI and The Royal Canadian Mounted Police. They need him to take out Bigfoot.

Apparently, at some point in the film, Bigfoot throws up all over Sam Elliot and when asked if that was the kind of script he had been waiting for, Elliot explains how he got involved with the project:

"I don’t know why over the last few years good fortune has smiled on me. I know we’ve talked about it before, and this is part of it. This script came out of nowhere and there was no not wanting to do it. I was working on The Ranch at the time and had very little window to work through my hiatus. I also had another film I was going to do. And, I walked away from it for about five minutes; Robert had written a letter to my agent that I became privy to, and I read it and was overcome by the content of it. I called Robert and said “I’m in.” It’s just the kind of stuff I want to do; it’s good material, great material. It was a first-time filmmaker directing it, but he also wrote it, so who better to direct it. And he had some brilliant filmmakers at his side. How could you not want to do this?
"More than anything, Calvin Barr spoke to me. I didn’t know much about that war he was in [World War II]; I know men who where in that war and I’ve portrayed a guy who was in that war in all three major conflicts in We Were Soldiers. I talked to a number of people in that war, but my war was the Vietnam War. I think on some level, war is war; and PTSD is PTSD, and I think Calvin suffered from it. That was part of his persona, at least that was my take on it. I understand lost love, and I think that can destroy a man more than anything if it was a deep love that is lost somehow. There was a lot I understood about Barr, and I like to think that I’m a decent human being, and I know at the core, Calvin Barr is a decent human being. There were a lot of things that spoke to me about him. (long pause) Being vomited on by Bigfoot was not one of the things I knew about."

When talking about creating this story and the character that Elliot plays, the writer and director said:

"The whole script always felt organic and came out of this place of wanting to write this big, iconic action hero, but his core is simple decency. In these strange times, I wanted to point people to someone like that. The hardest section, and the most difficult section, to write is when Calvin sits down with the FBI and RCMP. That was my chance to make it all as real as it could ever be. If the audience believes what those guys are saying, then they’ll roll with the rest of the movie. And in that moment, he gets to explain his feelings on Nazism, the notion that ideas can be monsters, and then selling this whole notion of Bigfoot and making it real. If that scene worked, the rest would work; if it didn’t, it wouldn’t. It was just a roll of the dice."

He went on to talk about the most fun and challenging part about telling this story, saying:

"The puzzle was, how can we, in 2018, believe that in 1987, these two things could have happened. How do you even approach selling that? How do you connect the dots so that a man killed Hitler, and then history marches on just like we read about. That was the most fun and challenging part of the script, and when I figured that out, it gave me permission to do all of the other crazy stuff. Then when you see Sam in the movie, he’s so deadly serious and sells it so honestly, and Ron Livingston [playing the FBI agent] is giving so much on his face for Sam to work with. I was going, 'I believe this and I don’t believe any of this.'"

The film recently screened at the Fantasia Film Festival and I've been hearing a lot of great things. The report says that there's a Bigfoot scene in the film that alone is worth the price of admission. There's apparently a lot of stunt work involved with this scene and Elliott said that he did most of that stunt work himself. When asked about the stunt work, he explained:

"Most of it. There was a double around, and we used him when Bigfoot jumped on me off of a rock, and the stunt guy sprained his ankle in that moment. We’d done a lot of the fight scene up to that point, and the second he stepped in for that stunt, he sprained his ankle. Mind you, I haven’t seen the film, but maybe there’s a shot of me going into a rock…"

Sounds like a blast! There's no word on when this movie will come out, but I can't wait to see it!

GeekTyrant Homepage